Go Back

Foraged Crabapple Jelly

This delightfully sweet, canning-safe jelly recipe is made from foraged crabapples.
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time15 mins
Processing Time5 mins
Total Time45 mins
Course: Breakfast, Condiment
Cuisine: American, English
Keyword: blueberry jam, charoset, crab apple, crabapple, jelly, rose
Servings: 20 ounces
Author: The Elegant Economist
Cost: $1

Equipment

  • Large pan for cooking your apples (I like Staub's Perfect Pan)
  • Potato masher for crushing apples
  • Jelly Jars (sterilised)
  • Water bath canning equipment, for processing (if desired)

Ingredients

  • 4 pounds crabapples, stem and blossom end removed (1.8kg)
  • cups granulated sugar (305g)
  • 2 Tbsp dried rose petals (or a small handful fresh)
  • water enough to cover your crabapples

Instructions

Preparing the Crabapples

  • Wash your crabapples thoroughly, then remove the stems and blossom end. Cut in half.

Cooking the Crabapples

  • Place in a large pan with just enough water to cover. Simmer over medium heat until the apples are soft (about ten minutes).
  • Once the apples are soft, turn off the heat and use a potato masher to crush the apples.
  • Strain the apple puree in a jelly bag for 2 hours or overnight, then discard (compost!) the apple mush. You can squeeze the bag for more juice and flavour, but this may make the jelly slightly cloudy (it'll still taste amazing).

Making the Jelly

  • For every cup (240ml) of juice reserved, add 3/4 cup (150g) granulated sugar. Add dried rose petals if using, then bring to a boil over medium-high heat.
  • Cook the mixture for 5-10 minutes, skimming any foam from the top. Begin checking the mixture after about five minutes in the freezer to ensure it gels. Once the jelly is setting, you can remove from the heat.
  • Pour the hot jelly into sterilised jam jars and process or refrigerate.

Processing Jelly

  • Using a hot water bath canning method, process for 5 minutes for 4 ounce jars. If at an altitude higher than sea level, process an additional minute for every 1000 feet above sea level.

Notes

Processed jelly is good for at least 12 months and is shelf stable. Refrigerated jelly should be used within 2-3 months. 
Bitnami